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Orlando Police False Alarm Reduction Program

The City of Orlando Alarm Ordinance was implemented in 1999 to address the growing number of false alarm activations.

Download the False Alarm Reduction Brochure

What is a False Alarm?

A false alarm is described as the activation of an alarm system signal or message which elicits a notification to and/or response by the Orlando Police or Fire Departments when there is no evidence of a crime, fire, medical emergency or other activity which warrants a call for immediate police, fire or medical assistance. This may include, but is not limited to, an alarm discovered by a police officer or firefighter before notification of an alarm from a monitor or from a local alarm system that is not monitored.

What’s New

  • Effective June 1, 2013, City of Orlando Code, Chapter 41 required all active alarm systems to be registered with the Orlando Police Department and new installations to obtain a permit. Click here to view the City of Orlando Alarm Ordinance. Registering alarm systems will prevent delays in response due to incomplete or inaccurate addresses, alert officers to any hazardous materials or situations at the location and provide emergency contact information.
  • New Alarm software has been installed to assist in the management of false alarm records. Citizens will be able to register, view alarm activation history, obtain false alarm prevention suggestions and make payments online. Alarm companies can apply for permits and track customer accounts.
  • The False Alarm Fee Structure:

Residential Accounts

Number of False Alarms within 12-month periodFine
1 - 3No Fine
4 -6$50 per false alarm
7 or more$100 per false alarm
Unregistered Residential Alarm$50 per activation

Commercial Accounts

Number of False Alarms within 12-month periodFine
1 - 2No Fine
3 - 4$50 per false alarm
5 or more$100 per false alarm
Unregistered Commercial Alarm$50 per activation

What are the most frequent human errors that cause false alarms?

Residential:

  • Incorrect keypad procedures
  • Failure to train other authorized users (i.e. sitters, relatives, children, house guests, etc.)
  • Failure to secure doors and windows before arming your alarm

Commercial:

  • Use of incorrect keypad codes • Failure to train other authorized users (i.e., employees, custodial workers, delivery personnel, etc.)
  • Failure to notify your monitoring facility of unscheduled openings or closings for businesses using a set schedule
  • Failure to update authorized personnel list with your monitoring facility
  • Failure to secure doors and windows before arming your alarm

What are the most frequent equipment malfunctions that cause false alarms?

  • Improper application or installation of interior motion sensors
  • Improper application or installation of outdoor beams
  • Improper charging or checking of batteries
  • Faulty equipment (i.e., panels, detectors, keypads, etc.)
  • Failure to secure doors and windows before arming your alarm

What can citizens do to reduce false alarms?

  • Check the system batteries regularly, especially if you experience several power outages.
  • Ensure there is a sufficient pet path to avoid activation when your pet walks around your home.
  • Check all of the contacts on your doors and windows every six months. Make sure they are in good condition and properly adhered to the surface. Notify your alarm company as soon as possible if you feel the contacts or wiring are in need of repair or replacement.
  • Check for lizards, spiders, or other “critters” that may crawl across a motion detector lens. Clean the motion sensors of dust, cobwebs and debris regularly.
  • Keep balloons, fans and heaters away from the motion sensor areas of your home. Remember curtains and blinds may have movement from blowing air conditioners.
  • Close and lock all doors and windows tightly.
  • After activating your alarm system, wait a few moments to ensure it arms properly.
  • If the alarm is set off accidentally, immediately contact your alarm company or remain in the home until they have contacted you. Providing the proper code to the alarm representative will ensure an officer is not dispatched unnecessarily. Be sure that everyone with access to the system knows the proper code and how to arm and disarm the system.
  • If you suspect your alarm is malfunctioning, contact your alarm company as soon as possible and have the necessary repairs made.
  • Be aware of changes in the environment (i.e., new animals, design changes, seasonal decorations, plants, etc.) that might have an impact on your alarm.

For more information on false alarm and crime prevention, visit these websites:

  • faraonline.org
  • alarm.org

For more information on the Orlando Police False Alarm Reduction Program and the City of Orlando Alarm Ordinance, contact Barbara Saunders at 321.235.5330 or alarmcoordinator@cityoforlando.net.

 

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